Endless Wonder

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Dear Mr. Vernon, we accept the fact that we had to sacrifice a whole Saturday in detention for whatever it was we did wrong. But we think you’re crazy to make an essay telling you who we think we are. You see us as you want to see us - in the simplest terms, in the most convenient definitions. But what we found out is that each one of us is a brain, an athlete, a basket case, a princess and a criminal. Does that answer your question? Sincerely yours, the Breakfast Club.

(Source: jmssmcavoy, via ilikepineapplesdealwithit)

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todayinhistory:

July 24th 1911: Bingham at Machu Picchu

On this day in 1911, American historian Hiram Bingham III with his Peruvian guides arrived at the Inca site of Machu Picchu in the mountains of Peru. Machu Picchu is a 15th Century Inca estate built for emperor Pachacuti which was abandoned as a result of the Spanish conquest. The site lay largely undisturbed for hundreds of years, with only locals knowing of its existence. However, with Bingham’s arrival at the site it became known to the wider world and was studied scientifically; he is thus attributed with ‘re-discovering’ the erroneously called ‘Lost City of the Incas’. Bingham took artefacts from the site to Yale University for examination and only recently has the university agreed to return them to Peru. In the years since Bingham’s expedition, his grandoise claims of how he trekked through wilderness to find the ‘lost city’ have been discredited and instead it has been stressed how the site was accessible and well known to locals. However he is still renowned as the man who introduced the world to this spectacular sight. Restoration work began soon after Bingham’s expedition and the site has since become a major tourist attraction.

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todayinhistory:

July 25th 1853: Joaquin Murrieta killed

On this day in 1853 the Mexican outlaw Joaquin Murrieta, sometimes known as ‘the Robin Hood of El Dorado’, was supposedly killed by California Rangers. Most sources agree that he moved to California in 1849 to seek his fortune after the Gold Rush. He and his family were subject to racial discrimination, and eventually were attacked by American miners; Murrieta was beaten, his wife raped and his brother murdered. After this he supposedly, having been rejected legal help, sought vengeance and formed a gang of outlaws. However this story appears only in a 1854 novelised version of his life, though he was undoubtedly discriminated against, and other accounts say he turned to crime in frustration at being prevented from finding work. His gang took part in cattle rustling, bank robberies and murder. Eventually the infamy of their gang led the Governor of California to form the State Rangers and place a $5,000 bounty on Murrieta’s head. On July 25th 1853, the Rangers attacked the outlaws’ camp by surprise and in the ensuing gunbattle eight bandits, supposedly including Murrieta himself, were killed. To claim the reward, the Rangers decapitated Murrieta and preserved his head, which later went on public display. To some, Joaquin Murrieta was just a violent bandit, but to others he is a Mexican hero who sought to correct the injustices faced by Mexicans in the United States. Murrieta has become a symbol of Mexican resistance to Anglo-American domination of California, and other lands ceded to the United States after their victory over Mexico in 1848. A group of his descendants continue to work to correct what they see as historical inaccuracies about his life that portray him as nothing more than a bandit. His status as a folk hero is further cemented by the debates over the veracity of stories of his death. Whilst many who knew him testified that the head the Rangers displayed was Murrieta’s, some of his relatives claimed it wasn’t, and thus theories abound that he actually survived and lived into old age.

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pbsthisdayinhistory:

July 22, 1933: Wiley Post completes first solo around-the-world flight in 7 Days
On this day in 1933, American aviator Wiley Post returned to New York after traveling 15,596 miles in the first solo around-the-world flight.  The flight lasted 7 days, 18 hours, and 49 minutes, during which time Post made 11 stops for fuel and rest. 
Post’s plane, the Winnie Mae (named for his daughter), is now on display at the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C.  In 1931, he completed an 8-day around-the-world trip on this plane along with navigator Harold Gatty.
Learn more about aviation milestones with this American Experience timeline.
Photo: “Winnie Mae” a Lockheed Vega aircraft of Wiley Post, when it was on display at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center. Wikimedia Commons.

pbsthisdayinhistory:

July 22, 1933: Wiley Post completes first solo around-the-world flight in 7 Days

On this day in 1933, American aviator Wiley Post returned to New York after traveling 15,596 miles in the first solo around-the-world flight.  The flight lasted 7 days, 18 hours, and 49 minutes, during which time Post made 11 stops for fuel and rest. 

Post’s plane, the Winnie Mae (named for his daughter), is now on display at the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C.  In 1931, he completed an 8-day around-the-world trip on this plane along with navigator Harold Gatty.

Learn more about aviation milestones with this American Experience timeline.

Photo: “Winnie Mae” a Lockheed Vega aircraft of Wiley Post, when it was on display at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center. Wikimedia Commons.

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pbsthisdayinhistory:

July 23, 1885: 18th President, Ulysses S. Grant, Dies at Age 63
On this day in 1885, 18th President of the United States and Civil War hero, Ulysses S. Grant, died at Mount McGregor, New York, at the age of 63 from throat cancer.
Grant served in the Mexican-American War and was a Union general in the Civil War before serving two terms as president.  Shortly before his death, he finished writing two memoirs  with the help of his publisher, Mark Twain.
 Check out these pro- and anti-Grant political cartoons from American Experience’s “Ulysses S. Grant.” 
Photo: Wikimedia Commons

pbsthisdayinhistory:

July 23, 1885: 18th President, Ulysses S. Grant, Dies at Age 63

On this day in 1885, 18th President of the United States and Civil War hero, Ulysses S. Grant, died at Mount McGregor, New York, at the age of 63 from throat cancer.

Grant served in the Mexican-American War and was a Union general in the Civil War before serving two terms as president.  Shortly before his death, he finished writing two memoirs  with the help of his publisher, Mark Twain.

Check out these pro- and anti-Grant political cartoons from American Experience’s “Ulysses S. Grant.”

Photo: Wikimedia Commons

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pbsthisdayinhistory:

July 24, 1847:  Brigham Young Leads Mormon Pioneers to Utah’s Great Salt Lake
On this day in 1847, after 17 months of traveling, Mormon leader Brigham Young and 148 pioneers arrived in modern-day Utah.  Seeking refuge and religious and political freedom, Young and his followers began preparations in this remote location for the thousands of Mormon migrants to follow.
Find out what led to the “Great Mormon Migration” courtesy of American Experience here.
Photo: Brigham Young by Charles William Carter. Wikimedia Commons.

pbsthisdayinhistory:

July 24, 1847:  Brigham Young Leads Mormon Pioneers to Utah’s Great Salt Lake

On this day in 1847, after 17 months of traveling, Mormon leader Brigham Young and 148 pioneers arrived in modern-day Utah.  Seeking refuge and religious and political freedom, Young and his followers began preparations in this remote location for the thousands of Mormon migrants to follow.

Find out what led to the “Great Mormon Migration” courtesy of American Experience here.

Photo: Brigham Young by Charles William Carter. Wikimedia Commons.

Filed under history

431 notes

pbsthisdayinhistory:

July 25, 1978: The First Test Tube Baby is Born
On this day in 1978, Louise Joy Brown, the world’s first baby to be conceived by in vitro fertilization (IVF), was born to Lesley and Peter Brown in Manchester, England.  The Brown family faced intense media attention regarding the ethics and legality of the experimental and revolutionary procedure.  IVF has become so common that there have been over 5 million babies born this way in the past 36 years.
 Learn about the history of in vitro fertilization with this American Experience timeline.
Photo: Biologist Robert Edwards holds baby Louise Brown, the first test-tube baby, on July 25, 1978. (Photo by Keystone-France/Gamma-Keystone via Getty Images)

pbsthisdayinhistory:

July 25, 1978: The First Test Tube Baby is Born

On this day in 1978, Louise Joy Brown, the world’s first baby to be conceived by in vitro fertilization (IVF), was born to Lesley and Peter Brown in Manchester, England.  The Brown family faced intense media attention regarding the ethics and legality of the experimental and revolutionary procedure.  IVF has become so common that there have been over 5 million babies born this way in the past 36 years.

Learn about the history of in vitro fertilization with this American Experience timeline.

Photo: Biologist Robert Edwards holds baby Louise Brown, the first test-tube baby, on July 25, 1978. (Photo by Keystone-France/Gamma-Keystone via Getty Images)

Filed under history